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The Library Web Site and Open Access

The library website is an important advocacy tool for providing up-to-date information about Open Access. As opposed to more general Open Access websites, the library website can tailor and contextualise the information for researchers and point to specific resources of relevance. The primary audience will be the research community, but the website could also contain sections for other audiences, such as administrators and the public. Open Access websites typically contain general information pages, repository pages and Open Access journal pages.

A study on how library websites are helping to promote Open Access found that many library websites did not make Open Access a prominent feature, necessitating a long search around the website before finding the relevant information. In other cases, libraries had obvious and high-quality information about Open Access on their websites, but did not promote the institutional repository strongly enough. A library website should flag up Open Access prominently, and provide interested readers with clear routes to both authoritative information about Open Access and the repository, which should itself be supported by a set or resources on Open Access and its benefits. The library catalogue should also include all the journals listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals.

Open Access information pages

Open Access information pages typically contain a general description of Open Access. Broadly, this section will define Open Access and discuss the two methods of implementation: Open Access journals (the ‘gold’ route) and Open Access repositories (the ‘green’ route). Other common elements of Open Access information pages are outlined below. it is helpful to provide tailored information for different constituencies – authors and research managers and administrators. More ...

Institutional repository web pages

The institutional repository website should provide all the resources that may be required by depositors and users. More …

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